What Is Kung Pao Beef?

Thinly sliced steak, bell peppers, onions, and roasted peanuts are all included in this dish of kung pao beef, which is then covered in a flavorful and hot sauce. A reimagined version of the well-known takeout classic that surpasses restaurant quality

I enjoy recreating the Chinese food that my family enjoys at home, such as Szechuan chicken, beef and broccoli, pork fried rice, and kung pao beef. This stir fry is incredibly simple to prepare and tastes great over steamed rice.

Years ago, I started ordering kung pao beef at my neighborhood Chinese restaurant because I loved the flavorful steak and crunchy vegetables with the spicy sauce. Since learning how to prepare this dish at home, I no longer have to pick up the phone to order takeout and can now quickly prepare my favorite meal.

What is “Kung Pao”?

Kung Pao Chicken is a dish from Sichuan province. Due to its popularity, it also spread to other provinces with different variations. The dish is hot and uses a lot of chopped garlic, ginger, and Sichuan peppercorns.

A good Kung pao dish has acidity and brightness added by rice wine vinegar, which is also one of its qualities. For the beef version, we applied these same basic principles.

A Note on Peanuts

For any Kung Pao dish, we suggest using raw shelled peanuts (without the skin). Raw peanuts are wok-roasted slowly to impart a delicious nutty flavor that makes the dish stand out. It’s a labor of love. You can use shelled, roasted, unsalted peanuts if you’re pressed for time.

Consequently, you might be wondering what I mean when I say “crusty beef.” ” It doesn’t sound all too appealing at first. Those of you who have tried our Hunan beef recipe and Mongolian beef recipe are aware of how delicious it is.

When beef is velveted with cornstarch and other ingredients, then seared at a high temperature to create caramelized crispy edges, we refer to it as crusty beef.

The beef must first be velveted, using just enough cornstarch to create a crust when it comes in contact with the hot oil. The result is that the beef has an almost crispy texture when you sear both sides of it in a smoking hot wok with ample oil.

Determining When to Add the Aromatics

Depending on whether you prefer a fresher or more mellow flavor, you can add the ginger and garlic to a dish either at the start or near the end of the stir-frying process.

I enjoy incorporating the ginger at the beginning to infuse the oil and lessen its bite.

For the garlic, however, it’s a different story. I prefer to add it here at the end so that the slightly raw flavor of the garlic counterbalances the dish’s other rich flavors.

We have started to use chopped garlic more frequently when preparing some of our other favorite dishes because it truly makes a difference. Not all garlic needs to be caramelized!.

Another signature Kung Pao flavor is fragrant Sichuan peppercorns. Because it is convenient and easy to use, Sichuan peppercorn powder is preferred over whole Sichuan peppercorns because it provides a distinctive flavor without the same strong numbing effects. To avoid scorching the powder and giving the dish a faintly bitter flavor, add it with the sauce. (Kaitlin learned this early when developing her signature Mapo Tofu!).

Last but certainly not least are the dried chili peppers. The dried peppers should be added early so they can toast in the oil and enhance the dish’s spiciness, aroma, and flavor. The amount you add will determine how spicy the dish will be.

People frequently sort through the peppers in dishes like this, but I prefer to eat the toasted spicy peppers and eat a little bit with each bite.

What Is Kung Pao Beef?

Mix the beef, cornstarch, Shaoxing wine, oil, oyster sauce, and baking soda in a medium bowl until the beef is thoroughly coated. Marinate for 1 hour at room temperature.

Warm water or stock, light soy sauce, rice vinegar, sugar, cornstarch, hoisin sauce, Sichuan peppercorn powder, dark soy sauce, and sesame oil should all be combined to make the sauce. Set aside.

What Is Kung Pao Beef?

The peanuts are added to a wok that is heated with 1 tablespoon of oil over medium heat. Stir continuously for 5 minutes, or until fragrant and golden brown (or they’ll burn). Using the remaining heat in the wok, turn off the heat and stir for an additional minute. Set aside to cool. They will turn crunchy once they’re cooled completely. Alternatively, you can use already-roasted shelled peanuts and omit this step.

What Is Kung Pao Beef?

What Is Kung Pao Beef?

Add 2 more tablespoons of oil to the wok. Heat the wok over high heat until it’s just smoking. The beef should be seared for 112 minutes on each side, or until it begins to turn slightly crispy.

What Is Kung Pao Beef?

What Is Kung Pao Beef?

It’s crucial to use a hot wok to prevent overcooking the beef. Turn down the heat and remove the beef from the wok, reserving any remaining oil.

What Is Kung Pao Beef?

Over low heat, add the ginger and chilies.

What Is Kung Pao Beef?

Toast until fragrant, taking care not to burn them. Add the bell peppers and white portions of the scallion. Cook for 1-2 minutes, until fragrant. Add the garlic, and stir-fry for 20 seconds.

What Is Kung Pao Beef?

Return the beef to the wok along with any juices, and turn the heat to high. Stir-fry for 30 seconds.

What Is Kung Pao Beef?

Your prepared sauce needs to be well-incorporated because the cornstarch will have settled to the bottom. To deglaze the wok, add the sauce and combine everything.

What Is Kung Pao Beef?

Add the peanuts and the green scallions once the sauce has thickened and is simmering.

What Is Kung Pao Beef?

What Is Kung Pao Beef?

Although there shouldn’t be any standing sauce, you can add a little water or stock if it appears to be too thick. After one last stir, turn off the heat and serve the dish with jasmine rice!

What Is Kung Pao Beef?

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What Is Kung Pao Beef?

  • 12 ounces of beef flank steak, thinly sliced (about 0 inches). 6cm thick pieces).
  • 2 teaspoons cornstarch
  • 2 teaspoons Shaoxing wine
  • 2 teaspoons oil (canola, avocado, or any other neutral oil with a high smoke point)
  • 2 teaspoons oyster sauce
  • 1/8 teaspoon baking soda

To roast the peanuts (or substitute unsalted roasted shelled peanuts and skip this step!):

  • 1 tablespoon of oil, preferably one with a high smoke point and neutral flavor.
  • 1 cup raw peanuts (shelled and skinned)

For the rest of the dish:

  • 2 tablespoons of oil (any kind of smoke-point-high, neutral oil)
  • 1 teaspoon fresh ginger (minced)
  • 5 dried red chilies (deseeded and sliced; these can be spicy; adjust to your own taste)
  • 1/2 cup diced bell pepper, preferably red, orange, or yellow
  • 2 scallions (chopped, white and green parts separated)
  • 2 cloves garlic (chopped)
  • Mix the beef, cornstarch, Shaoxing wine, oil, oyster sauce, and baking soda in a medium bowl until the beef is thoroughly coated. Marinate for 1 hour at room temperature.
  • Warm water or stock, light soy sauce, rice vinegar, sugar, cornstarch, hoisin sauce, Sichuan peppercorn powder, dark soy sauce, and sesame oil should all be combined to make the sauce. Set aside.
  • The peanuts are added to a wok that is heated with 1 tablespoon of oil over medium heat. Stir continuously for 5 minutes, or until fragrant and golden brown (or they’ll burn). Using the remaining heat in the wok, turn off the heat and stir for an additional minute. Set aside to cool. They will turn crunchy once they’re cooled completely. Alternatively, you can use already-roasted shelled peanuts and omit this step.
  • Add 2 more tablespoons of oil to the wok. Heat the wok over high heat until it’s just smoking. The beef should be seared for 112 minutes on each side, or until it begins to turn slightly crispy. It’s crucial to use a hot wok to prevent overcooking the beef. Turn down the heat and remove the beef from the wok, reserving any remaining oil.
  • Over low heat, add the ginger and chilies. Toast until fragrant, taking care not to burn them. Add the bell peppers and white portions of the scallion. Cook for 1-2 minutes, until fragrant. Add the garlic, and stir-fry for 20 seconds.
  • Return the beef to the wok along with any juices, and turn the heat to high. Stir-fry for 30 seconds.
  • Your prepared sauce needs to be well-incorporated because the cornstarch will have settled to the bottom. To deglaze the wok, add the sauce and combine everything.
  • Add the peanuts and the green scallions once the sauce has thickened and is simmering. Although there shouldn’t be any standing sauce, you can add a little water or stock if it appears to be too thick. After one last stir, turn off the heat and serve the dish with jasmine rice!

TheWoksofLife. com is written and produced for informational purposes only. Although we try our best to provide nutritional information to our readers as a general guide, the values provided should be regarded as estimates since we are not certified nutritionists. brands that were purchased, naturally occurring variations in fresh ingredients, etc. will change the nutritional information in any recipe. Additionally, depending on their sources, different online calculators produce various results. Utilize your preferred nutrition calculator to calculate the nutritional information for a recipe using the actual ingredients and quantities used.

Kung Pao Beef | A Tasty and Worthwhile update to Classic Kung Pao Chicken | The Woks of Life

FAQ

What’s the difference between kung pao beef and Mongolian beef?

What distinguishes mongolian beef from kung pao beef? Kung pao beef is a Szechuan dish made with hot sauce and sour chilies. Mongolian beef is not at all spicy, whereas Kung Pao beef is very spicy.

What does kung pao taste like?

Kung Pao sauce has a robust flavor that is sweet, sour, savory, and includes the distinctive tingle of heat from Sichuan pepper.

Is kung pao really spicy?

Due to the addition of both fresh and dried chilies as well as Sichuan peppercorns, which provide a tongue-numbing sensation, kung pao chicken is fairly spicy. You can reduce the spiciness by using milder chilies and fewer of the hot peppercorns.

What’s the difference between kung pao beef and Szechuan beef?

Two of the most well-known are Szechuan and Kung Pao, and they are frequently contrasted. Kung pao is a sweet and sour dish that is frequently made with peanuts, whereas Szechuan is a spicy dish that is typically made with chili peppers. Also very well-liked is Mongolian food, which is renowned for its robust flavors.

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